A Guide to Giving Feedback on Web UI, UX, and Web Applications (Without Wanting to Pull Your Hair Out)

 

A Guide to Giving Feedback on Web UI, UX, and Web Applications
Here are some simple techniques that you can use to provide useful feedback that will help your web development team understand how to get what you want.
Be Specific - Don't Beat Around the Bush
When providing feedback, be as specific as possible. Don't beat around the bush or use vague language. Instead, use concrete examples to illustrate your point. For instance, instead of saying "I don't like the layout," say "I think the layout would work better if the logo was moved to the left and the navigation bar was at the top." Point out the features from the initial web development specification if there are any deviations.
Do not give functional-level feedback and be focused on UI and UX.
Use Visuals - A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
Visual aids are your friend. Use screenshots, annotations, or even sketches to illustrate your feedback. This will help your web development team visualize what you're trying to say and make it easier for them to implement the changes. If you can take screenshots and draw/write your feedback on the images, that should work well.
Keep It Simple - Don't Overcomplicate Things
Avoid using technical jargon or complicated language when providing feedback. Keep it simple and straightforward. Your web development team doesn't need to know the ins and outs of your industry jargon. They just need to know what changes you want to see.
Be Constructive - Not Destructive
Remember, feedback is not about criticizing or finding fault. It's about working together to make the product better. So, be constructive in your feedback. Point out the things that are working well and suggest improvements for the things that aren't.
Sending feedback to a person unknown requires patience, as you are aware the goal is to get things done right. Leave some appreciation for UI, especially when you give a lot of changes. This will motivate the designer to come up with better things next.
Be Timely - Don't Wait Until It's Too Late
Finally, provide feedback in a timely manner. Don't wait until the project is almost complete to provide feedback. This will only lead to frustration and delays. Instead, provide feedback at regular intervals throughout the project. Your developer might be working on more than one project, and timely feedback speaks a lot about you. It gives them an impression that you equally expect timely responses.
We hope these tips help you provide effective feedback to your web development team. Remember, giving feedback is an art that takes practice, but with the right techniques, you can become a pro. Happy feedback-ing!

We get it! Giving feedback to web development teams can be a daunting task, especially if you’re not tech-savvy. It’s like trying to explain to your grandparents how to use a smartphone – frustrating, time-consuming, and often leads to a lot of hair-pulling. But worry not, we’ve got you covered.

Here are some simple techniques that you can use to provide useful feedback that will help your web development team understand how to get what you want.

Be Specific – Don’t Beat Around the Bush

When providing feedback, be as specific as possible. Don’t beat around the bush or use vague language. Instead, use concrete examples to illustrate your point. For instance, instead of saying “I don’t like the layout,” say “I think the layout would work better if the logo was moved to the left and the navigation bar was at the top.” Point out the features from the initial web development specification if there are any deviations.

Do not give functional-level feedback and be focused on UI and UX.

Use Visuals – A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words

Visual aids are your friend. Use screenshots, annotations, or even sketches to illustrate your feedback. This will help your web development team visualize what you’re trying to say and make it easier for them to implement the changes. If you can take screenshots and draw/write your feedback on the images, that should work well.

Keep It Simple – Don’t Overcomplicate Things

Avoid using technical jargon or complicated language when providing feedback. Keep it simple and straightforward. Your web development team doesn’t need to know the ins and outs of your industry jargon. They just need to know what changes you want to see.

Be Constructive – Not Destructive

Remember, feedback is not about criticizing or finding fault. It’s about working together to make the product better. So, be constructive in your feedback. Point out the things that are working well and suggest improvements for the things that aren’t.

Sending feedback to a person unknown requires patience, as you are aware the goal is to get things done right. Leave some appreciation for UI, especially when you give a lot of changes. This will motivate the designer to come up with better things next.

Be Timely – Don’t Wait Until It’s Too Late

Finally, provide feedback in a timely manner. Don’t wait until the project is almost complete to provide feedback. This will only lead to frustration and delays. Instead, provide feedback at regular intervals throughout the project. Your developer might be working on more than one project, and timely feedback speaks a lot about you. It gives them an impression that you equally expect timely responses.

We hope these tips help you provide effective feedback to your web development team. Remember, giving feedback is an art that takes practice, but with the right techniques, you can become a pro. Happy feedback-ing!

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